Research Reports and Working Papers

Doña-Reveco, Cristián. 2014. “Migração internacional e integração regional: o caso da América do Sul”. Solicited contribution. PONTES Informações e análises sobre comércio e desenvolvimento sustentável, 10(10):9-12. Available online in Portuguese here.

Resumo: O autor analisa o tratamento da migração em processos de integração sul-americanos e argumenta que, nestes, a regulação do tema ainda se apoia em marcos legais nacionais, dificultando que os migrantes contribuam para o desenvolvimento dos países de origem e destino.

Doña-Reveco, Cristián. 2014. “Población y Desarrollo en el Programa del segundo Gobierno de Michelle Bachelet (2014-2018)”. Solicited contribution. Discusiones Públicas, 5(1):17-24. Available online here.

Resumen: Los temas de población y desarrollo han estado frecuentemente ausentes de los programas de gobierno en el Chile postdictatorial. En este ensayo presento un breve análisis del programa del segundo gobierno de Michelle Bachelet y su propuesta de “cincuenta medidas” para los primeros 100 días de gobierno desde una perspectiva de población y desarrollo. Enfocando en particular en el análisis de temas de migración internacional, natalidad y fecundidad, migración interna y envejecimiento de la población, propongo que si bien estos temas están latentes en estos dos documentos de política, se presentan como temas aislados sin conexión con propuestas macro-estructurales de desarrollo del país.

Abstract: The topic of population and development has not been present in the governmental programs in post-dictatorial Chile. In this essay I present a brief analysis of the political program of Michelle Bachelet’s second presidency and her “fifty actions” for her first 100 days of government from a perspective of population and development. Focusing on the analysis of international migration, fertility, internal migration, and aging of population, I argue that while these themes are latent in these two policy documents, there is no connection between proposals of national development and population themes.

Doña-Reveco, Cristián and Amanda Levinson. June 2012. Chile: A Growing Destination Country in Search de a Coherent Approach to Migration; Country Profile, Migration Policy Institute, Washington DC. Available online here.

Introduction:Cornered in the southeast extreme of the Americas, Chile developed as a socially and culturally insular country unaccustomed to the presence of large numbers of foreigners. Its geographic isolation, which set up the first European immigrants as arbiters of who could arrive next, engendered early migration policies that were discriminatory. The desire to encourage white, European males to populate the country and “improve the race” was evident in policies that resulted in influxes of European immigration in the 19th and 20th centuries. Although the overall number of immigrants during this early period was relatively small, their presence transformed the country technologically, economically, religiously, and culturally.Nonetheless, even most white migrants have bypassed Chile over the decades in favor of countries such as Argentina and Brazil, where they perceived greater economic opportunities. Throughout most of Chile’s history, the foreign-born have remained between one and two percent of the total population; in fact, until recently Chile was mostly known as a sending country, with an estimated 6% of its population living abroad.

Because of these two factors—its isolation and its history of emigration, Chile has few formally established migration policies, and the ones in force are outdated.  Due to its continuing economic growth and reconsolidated political stability, and combined with a large community abroad and the increase in intra- and extra-regional immigration during the past decade, the country desperately needs a modernized and coherent migration policy. However, a lack of leadership at the governmental level has made this goal elusive. This is an update of the article “Chile: moving towards a migration policy” presented below.

Doña-Reveco, Cristián. 2010. “La migración internacional y el Estado Chileno: Notas para una discusión”. Discusiones Públicas, Sección Ensayos 1(1): 11-34.

Abstract: This essay is an introduction to the international migration in Chile in the last twenty years. Here I present the relevance of maintaining and strengthening the ties with Chileans abroad. I propose, as well, the importance of developing a migration policy base in the protection of the human rights of migrants. I suggest, however, that any policy must be developed in consensus with the society of reception. Available in Spanish here

Scheie, David; Craig McGarvey: Cristian Doña-Reveco; Stephanie J. Nawyn. 2008. Working Together for Comprehensive Reform, Findings from the 2007; Coalition for Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CCIR) Coalitional Networking Survey; Immigrant Participation & Immigration Reform (IPIR) Initiative; Touchstone Center for Collaborative Inquiry.

Cooperation in the statistical analysis for organizational survey to understand the state of the field regarding migration policy changes in the United States.

Scheie, David; Craig McGarvey; Cristian Doña-Reveco; Stephanie J. Nawyn. 2007. Strengthening the Grassroots Movement: Findings from the 2007 Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM) Coalitional Networking Survey, Touchstone Center for Collaborative Inquiry.

Cooperation in the statistical analysis for organizational survey to understand the state of the field regarding migration policy changes in the United States.

Doña-Reveco, Cristián and Amanda Levinson. 2004. Chile: Moving Towards a Migration Policy, Country Profile, Migration Policy Institute, Washington DC. Available online here.

Introduction:Bordered by the towering Andes to the east, desert to the north, the Pacific Ocean to the west, and the Antarctic to the south, Chile developed as a socially and culturally insular country unaccustomed to the presence of large numbers of foreigners. Its geographic isolation, which set up the first European immigrants as arbiters of who could arrive next, engendered early migration policies that were discriminatory. The desire to encourage white, European males to populate the country and “improve the race” was evident in policies that resulted in influxes of European immigration in the 19th and 20th centuries. Although the overall number of immigrants during this early period was relatively small, their presence transformed the country technologically, economically, religiously, and culturally.Nonetheless, even most white migrants have bypassed Chile over the decades in favor of countries such as Argentina and Venezuela, where they perceived greater economic opportunities. Throughout most of Chile’s history, the foreign-born have remained between one and two percent of the total population; in fact, Chile is most known not for the flow of people into its borders but for the many who have left it. During the military dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet, hundreds of thousands of Chileans fled the repressive political regime.

Because of these two factors—its isolation and its history of unregulated emigration as a result of political repression, Chile has few formally established migration policies, and the ones in force are outdated. However, the country’s continuing economic growth and reconsolidated political stability, combined with the increase in intra- and extra-regional immigration during the past decade, are pushing the country to develop a modernized and coherent migration policy.

Doña-Reveco, Cristián; Pedro Hérnandez and Soraya Mesa.  2003. Las Migraciones Internacionales: Análisis y perspectivas para una política migratoria, Documento de Trabajo # 2, CIMAL.

Available online here.

Doña-Reveco, Cristián. 2003. Breve reseña y análisis de la Convención Internacional sobre la protección de todos los trabajadores migratorios y sus familias, Documento de Trabajo # 1, CIMAL.

Available online here.

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